Mr H Goes To Carnwath

Way back in ye olde days, when my Dad got his first car – a second hand Austin 1100, in a delightful shade of bottle green – he used to go doon to Carnwath 4 or 5 times a year. He had aunts and uncles there on his mothers side, and it pleased him to drive on what were quiet country roads to visit them. He wouldnae go doon the lang whan, as he liked to detour via West Linton, where he would stop the car, and wax lyrical about how he planned to retire there, as it was his favourite village Ever.

Then he’s put his flask of tea away, and head off to Carnwath. Now, back in the 1800’s, his mothers family lived in Haywood, a prosperous mining village a couple of miles outside Carnwath. However, like many others, the closing of the mine slowly killed off the village, and where there was once 1200 people with their own Co-op, there’s nothing left bar a lonely war memorial. All the buildings were broken down, and the stone used to build houses elsewhere.

Haywood War Memorial
Posted Image

As the miners moved on, one lot of the family moved to Carnwath, and the others (my Dads lot) headed East to Breich, Fauldhouse, Addiewell, West Calder and Polbeth. But he was delighted to be able to visit his family, now he had a car, and from about the age of 5 till I was about 9, it was a regular weekend outing. Of course, then he became too ill to drive very far, and it all stopped.  So, for the first time in 35 years, I went back for a look.

It’s a lot less pretty than I remember, and the council houses my relatives used to live in are mingin nowadays. But that’s what 35 years of neglect will do. However, there is a nice wee church, a cracking bakers, a cafe through the back of the paper shop, and public toilets that are still open. I had a good wander, thinking back to being a bairn, and there’s a slideshow of picture over here.

Main Street, Carnwath
Posted Image

Train and bus to Carnwath
Posted Image

Advertisements

Hamilton miners: Woodmuir Colliery, West Lothian

A large number of the Bells and Hamiltons ended up working in the now derelict Woodmuir Colliery near Breich in West Lothian.

Thanks to the power of the internet, there is a selection of photos available here.

Here’s one of them, as an example;
Woodmuir CollieryIf you would like to see more about coal mining in the Lothians then I would heartily recommend “Mining The Lothians” by Guthrie Hutton, which you can get on Amazon.

If you want to know about shale mining, which is what the Hamiltons did before they dug for coal, then try “Shale Voices” by Alistair Findlay.  It’s also on Amazon, although not a particularly easy  read.  However, despite it being a huge industry, employing 10,000 people at its peak, it’s Scotland’s forgotten industry.